"For skillful and godly Wisdom is better than rubies or pearls,
and all the things that may be desired are not to be compared with it." Proverbs 8:11 Amplified

Sunday, August 2, 2009

Vassal or Vessel?

Acts 9:15 NKJV
…he is a chosen vessel of Mine to bear My name before Gentiles, kings, and the children of Israel.

“God please use me.”
Have you ever prayed that? Sure you have, most of us have, but what are we saying when we pray that? Do we really want to be “used” by God?

Be truthful, no one likes to be “used” by another person.

What is your reaction when you realize that someone has “used” you to promote themselves? Do you respond with anger, or bitterness, maybe you find yourself saying, “I will never let that happen to me again.”

In light of this, why would we pray to be “used” by God?

I know, I know, it sounds so spiritual.

What God desires from us is the willingness to be a vessel though which He can work.

God wants VESSELS, not VASSALS.

A vassal is a person who is a servant or slave. It also means to be subjected to control, to enslave.

A vessel is a person into whom some quality (as grace) is infused.

We pour into vessels, and then pour out of them. God pours into us what He needs us to pour out to others. This isn’t” using”; this is sharing in the work.

God wants to do a beautiful work through us. In the book of Acts He says about us: “he is a chosen vessel of Mine to bear My name.”

Chosen: “to want; desire.” God desires to impart into you a quality that will be used for His kingdom. You are not a servant or slave, you are a son. Gal 4:7 Wherefore thou art no more a servant, but a son; and if a son, then an heir of God through Christ.

Josh 24:15 NIV… then choose for yourselves this day whom you will serve…

So what is your preference?

Choose this day; will you serve God as a Vassal, or as a Vessel?

Image from MorgueFile

7 comments:

Denise Miller Holmes said...

Great point, Diane. I heard Chris Matthews say once that people don't mind being used. What they mind is being used and discarded. I think your point about sharing in the work is so true. We do not serve a demanding master. We serve a loving God with whom we have a close connection.

Need More Words said...

Denise,
Thank you for your comments.
I haven't watched Chris Matthews, I'll need to check him out.
I hadn't thought of the "being discarded" part. Thanks for adding more depth to what I was trying to say.

smithsk said...

When you mentioned God using vessels like us, Diane, Jesus' first miracle came to mind. Jesus at the wedding of Cana had the old beat up vessels brought out. Then He filled them with water and out of them poured out the new wine, which was the best wine of the feast.
Susan

Need More Words said...

Oh Susan, What a great example of what I was trying to say. We all hope to have the best wine flowing out of us.

DenaNetherton said...

So true; I don't like the idea of being used. But I've often asked God to please use me, even though I'm a little afraid of His will. What terrifying thing will He ask me to do?
In fact, everything He's called me to do has been more wonderful, more adventure-filled, more rewarding than anything I could have dreamed up.

Need More Words said...

Dena,
Isn't that like us, being fearful of what God might ask us to do. He usually asks us to do things that are a stretch, but doesn't it feel good to stretch!

Bill said...

Yes, we can be vessels of grace, but that's not all. There's wrath. See Romans 9:14-23. A side issue (in t hat section) is, how can God punish someone who is bad because He makes them do wrong, like Pharaoh? Answer: We human vessels are like pots made by a potter, and have no right to complain. It follows that, if we can't complain about undeserved wrath, we shouldn't be thankful for undeserved grace. This part of the Bible disturbs me greatly.... People sometimes tell me I talk too much. Maybe I am making them vessels for my thoughts. I think no one likes to be a vessel. Something like that was expressed earlier here, but I think the gist of the thread is, if God does it, it's good. (But what about wrath?)